The Producer Offset is for Australian film and television, including official co-productions. Projects with US involvement may qualify for the Offset, if they pass a ‘significant Australian content’ test.

What is the Producer Offset?

The Producer Offset is a rebate on the qualifying costs of making Australian film and TV and covers almost all production services provided in Australia, not just labour. It is not a tax credit and does not need to be on-sold to a tax-payer. Claims are made by the Australian production company through the tax system and delivered to the Australian producer, following the end of the financial year in which the project was completed.

Qualifying spend broadly includes all goods and services provided in Australia, including non-Australian ATLs working in Australia on the film.

For feature films the Offset is worth up to 40% of qualifying Australian production costs. For eligible TV and documentaries, it is worth up to 20% of qualifying costs.

There is no cap on the amount of the Offset payable, although there are some limits on specific types of production costs as a percentage of total production expenditure.

What makes the Producer Offset attractive?

For feature films the Offset is generous compared to other initiatives worldwide. Most territories with a rebate set at a similar level do not also have Australia’s filmmaking attributes or experience.

The Offset has the certainty offered by legislation. Since it was introduced in 2007, over 900 successful claims have been made. The system of issuing provisional Offset certificates before the film is produced means the return to the producer is predictable and certain. No project which has been issued with a provisional certificate before production has had its application for a final certificate rejected.

How does the Producer Offset work?

It works like this:

  • An Australian producer applies to Screen Australia for a provisional certificate, which operates as an eligibility guide and assessment of how much money he or she can expect to claim back under the Producer Offset.
  • A producer then borrows against the Offset and cashflows that loan into the budget as his or her own equity.
  • When the film is completed, the producer applies to Screen Australia and receives a final certificate.
  • The certificate is then submitted with the production company’s tax return to the Australian Taxation Office, which then pays out the Offset less any pre-existing tax liabilities.

What productions can claim the Producer Offset?

Only productions that have passed a ‘significant Australian content’ test or those made under Australia’s official international co-production arrangements are eligible to claim the Offset. (These are the films referred to in this section as ‘Australian films’.) A certain amount has to be spent on production in Australia to claim the Offset.

Can I apply without an Australian company?

No, the applicant must be an Australian company, or a foreign company that has Australian permanent residency and an Australian Business Number (ABN).

Why are only Australian films and TV programs eligible?

The Producer Offset was put in place to deliver ongoing cultural, professional and economic gains to the Australian screen industry.

The Producer Offset is one of a package of support measures, collectively called the Australian Screen Production Incentive.

What incentives can non-Australian producers access?

Non-Australian productions taking advantage of Australia as a filmmaking centre can access the Location Offset for overseas productions filmed in Australia, or the PDV Offset for productions that use Australia’s post-production and visual effects talents, irrespective of where filming occurred.

For more information on the Producer Offset and official Co-production Program see www.screenaustralia.gov.au/Business_with_Australia

For information on the Location and PDV Offsets see www.arts.gov.au/film-tv/australian-screen-production-incentive

For information on Australia’s financial incentives, locations, crews and studios see www.ausfilm.com.au

For services, locations and incentives offered by Australian state screen agencies see www.screenaustralia.gov.au/filmmaking/state_agencies

Testing for ‘significant Australian content’

To qualify for the Producer Offset, a film or TV program must pass a ‘significant Australian content’ (SAC) test. An official co-production, made under one of the permanent arrangements Australia has with 12 other countries, is the exception to this requirement: it bypasses the SAC test.

How flexible is the SAC test?

While it is necessary to have many Australian elements to pass the SAC test, the test is applied case by case and in a holistic manner, rather than rigidly. This gives applicants flexibility and allows Screen Australia to take account of each project’s unique aspect.

The many questions asked can be grouped under five key headings. They aren’t ‘criteria’ so it is not necessary to ‘meet’ them all but the greater the level of ‘Australianness’ that can be demonstrated under each heading, the more likely it is that a project will be deemed Australian.

The subject matter of the film. Is the look and feel of the film sufficiently Australian? Is the film about Australia or Australians? Was the film developed in Australia or by Australians? Is the film based on an Australian story, novel or other underlying work?

The place where the film was made. To what extent did pre-production, production and post-production occur in Australia?

The nationalities and places of residence of the persons who took part in the making of the film. Are the producer, director and writer Australian? Are the lead cast members Australian? Are the heads of departments Australian? Are Australian post-production houses being used? Is the on-set crew Australian?

The details of the production expenditure incurred in respect of the film. To what extent did the expenditure contribute to the maintenance and development of the Australian film industry? What proportion of the budget was incurred in Australia and what proportion of the budget was incurred on Australians.

Any other matters that Screen Australia considers relevant. Who has creative control? Who holds copyright in the film? Who profits from the film?

There need to be very compelling reasons for a film or TV program to be granted Australian status in cases where it is not set in Australia or about Australians, the early development happened outside Australia, or a large part of the principal photography occurred offshore.

Who is considered to be an Australian?

Anyone who is either an Australian citizen, regardless of where they live, or an Australian permanent resident, regardless of their citizenship.

What types of films would pass the SAC test, making them eligible for the Producer Offset?

As the administrator of the Producer Offset, Screen Australia cannot provide details of individual titles which have passed a SAC test or claimed the Producer Offset because of Australia’s strict tax secrecy laws. However, some hypothetical scenarios may be useful.

Example 1: a film that does not need to pass
Any official co-production.

Example 2: a film that would be likely to pass
Synopsis A thriller set in a small Australian town, revolving around a man trying to live under the witness protection program.
Subject matter Australian
Setting Australia
Characters Australian
Pr Australia
Shoot Australia
Post Australia
Writer Screenplay by an Australian writer, based on a US novel
Producer Australian
Director Australian
Heads of department (HODs) Australian, with the exception of the composer
Cast Two US leads, one Australian lead

Example 3: a film that may not pass
Synopsis A drama, set in a remote mining colony on Titan, about three astronauts who uncover some alien artefacts after a visit from an Australian space adventurer.
Subject matter Sci-fi
Setting Titan, a moon of Saturn
Characters American accented characters, but one Australian astronaut visits the space station
Pre Australia
Shoot Australia
Post Australia
Writer Original screenplay by a US writer
Producer One Australian, one US
Director Australian
HODs All Australian
Cast One key US above the line talent; three Australian leads

Example 4: a film very unlikely to pass being more suited to the 16.5% Location Offset
Synopsis A drama set in New York City revolving around the relationships of three students attending art school.
Subject matter Non-Australian
Setting US
Characters US
Pre Australia
Shoot Australia
Post US
Writer Screenplay by a US writer, adapted from a US novel
Producer One Australian, two US
Director US
HODs Australian
Cast Three US leads, some Australian supporting cast

Why apply for a provisional certificate?

It is possible but not compulsory to apply for a provisional certificate before a film or TV project goes into production. At the very least, a script, budget, finance plan and a list of the nationalities of the key creatives, crew and cast, must be provided.

A provisional certificate doesn’t guarantee that a final certificate will be issued but it provides guidance on whether a production is likely to qualify and also what the qualifying Australian production expenditure (QAPE) is likely to be.

Applications are accepted at any time and Screen Australia takes approximately (or about) six weeks to process them from receipt of a complete application form, unless they are referred to the Board of Screen Australia. Films and TV programs that do not clearly pass the SAC test are always referred to the Board.
For more information on the SAC test see www.screenaustralia.gov.au/producer_offset/eligibility_SAC.aspx

What counts as QAPE?

What counts as QAPE is very clear. It includes most of the major production costs incurred in Australia, including on goods and services, locations (but not gratuities) and the wages of all cast and crew (including those travelling to Australia from offshore, although crew must work on the film for two weeks for costs to qualify). Above the line costs (which in Australia includes only principal cast’s salaries and fringes, not other cast or travel and accommodation) are included in QAPE, subject to a limit of 20% of total budget. Non-feature documentaries are excluded from the above the line cap.

In the case of feature films developed and filmed wholly in Australia with Australian cast and crew, the only potentially significant costs not counted as QAPE are financing charges. For films such as this, the value of the Offset would generally be 37–38% of the total budget.

For detailed information on the treatment of particular expenses under the Producer Offset, see the QAPE resource guide At a Glance, available at www.screenaustralia.gov.au/producer_offset

Can costs incurred overseas while making an Australian film count as QAPE?

Yes, but not all the costs because, in essence, QAPE is money spent in Australia. Despite this, the wages and travel costs of Australian residents working overseas during principal photography can count as QAPE in limited circumstances. This is where the subject matter of an Australian story needs a particular offshore location. The money spent on non-Australians working outside of Australia at any time is always non-QAPE as is expenditure incurred on Australians working offshore outside the period of principal photography.

In general, when comparing Australian films made wholly within Australia to Australian films partly made overseas, the QAPE would be a smaller percentage of the budget.

In the case of official co-productions, only money spent by the Australian production partner can be claimed as QAPE and the rules referred to above regarding expenditure incurred outside Australia apply.

Once a production receives its provisional certification, what happens if additional non-Australian elements are subsequently introduced – eg the lead Australian actor pulls out from a role due to a scheduling conflict and is replaced by a British actor?

The provisional certificate acts as a guide to eligibility.
If something changes and the project has become more ‘Australian’ (eg a UK or foreign actor was replaced by an Australian actor) it is not significant and the applicant would not need to do anything, but if the project becomes ‘less Australian’, it becomes more significant and the SAC may be impacted. If there are significant changes, provisional certificate holders would seek confirmation that their SAC certification is not impacted by any changes by having their project reassessed.

How high does QAPE have to be for a project to be eligible for the Producer Offset?

For a feature film, including a documentary feature, or a telemovie, a direct-to-DVD feature, or other single-episode program, the QAPE has to be at least A$500,000.

For television drama series, documentary and animation there are thresholds for both the total QAPE and the per hour QAPE.

The QAPE per hour is calculated by dividing the total QAPE by the duration of the series measured in hours. Calculations must be included when claiming the Producer Offset.

For documentaries that are not features, whether it is a single production or made up of multiple episodes, QAPE must be at least A$500,000 and the QAPE per hour must be at least A$250,000.

For a drama series (or season) the QAPE threshold is A$1 million and the QAPE per hour must be at least A$500,000.

For short-form animations the QAPE threshold is A$250,000 and the QAPE per hour must be at least A$1 million.

In the case of official co-productions, expenditure in Australia’s partner country that would be regarded as QAPE if it was incurred in Australia, is QAPE for the purpose of meeting the expenditure thresholds above, but is not QAPE for the purpose of calculating the amount claimed back under the Producer Offset as a rebate.

For more information, and guidelines and tools for calculating QAPE, see www.screenaustralia.gov.au/producer_offset

Can I apply for more than one incentive for the same project? For example, the Location Offset and the Producer Offset?

No, you can only apply for one of the Australian Screen Production Incentive programs per project.

Determining ‘qualifying Australian production expenditure’ (QAPE)

The amount of money that can be claimed under the Producer Offset is not a percentage of the entire budget of an Australian film or TV program, but a percentage of the qualifying Australian production expenditure (QAPE).

The Producer Offset represents 40% of QAPE on feature films and 20% of QAPE on all other eligible formats.

Making a claim under the Producer Offset

Whereas Screen Australia administers the Producer Offset in accordance with the legislation and provides guidelines, application forms and general advice to producers, actual payments are made to the applicant company through the Australian company tax system.

The company must be either Australian or a foreign company with permanent Australian residency and an Australian Business Number (ABN).

What is involved in making a claim?

Once a production is completed, the Australian producer submits an application to the Producer Offset and Co-production Unit of Screen Australia, who ensures the eligibility requirements have been met and then determines which costs count as QAPE and issues a final certificate.

The Offset is then claimed by the Australian producer in their annual tax return to the Australian Tax Office for the financial year in which the film was completed. The Australian tax year runs from 1 July to 30 June.

How quickly are claims processed?

It is not possible to make a claim until a film is completed. Once completed, an application can be lodged with Screen Australia at any time.

Screen Australia generally takes 12 weeks to process final applications from receipt of a complete application. It may take longer for claims of A$15 million or more as they are always considered by the Board of Screen Australia.

Statistics

Certificates issued in 2014/15

Type Provisional Number Final Number Final Offset value (A$m)
Features 53 40 $57.26
Non-feature documentaries 48 69 $23.39
TV drama and other (eg direct-dvd/online, short-form animation) 27 40 $42.48
Total 128 149 $123.13

Provisional Certificates to 30 June 2015*

Type No. certificates
Features 395
Non-feature documentaries 464
TV drama and other (eg direct-dvd/online, short-form animation) 255
Total 1,114

Final Certificates to 30 June 2015*

Type No. certificates Total Offset (A$m)
Features 195 $676.14
Non-feature documentaries 464 $105.31
TV drama and other (eg direct-dvd/online, short-form animation) 240 $306.85
Total 899 $1,088.30

*since commencement of the Producer Offset on 1 July 2007 Figures may not total exactly due to rounding.

Australian directors with feature film credits earning >US$20 million worldwide

 

Director Title
Armstrong, Gillian Little Women (1994, US)
Beattie, Stuart I, Frankenstein (2014, US)
Beresford, Bruce Mao’s Last Dancer (2009, AUS)
Double Jeopardy (1999, US)
Driving Miss Daisy (1989, US)
Crimes of the Heart (1986, US)
Blair, Wayne The Sapphires (2012, AUS)
Blanks, Jamie Valentine (2001, US)
Urban Legend (1998, US)
Campion, Jane In the Cut (2003, US)
The Piano (1993, AUS)
Coleman, Warren (co-director) Happy Feet (2006, AUS)
Cornell, John Crocodile Dundee II (1988, AUS)
Cornwell, Peter The Haunting in Connecticut (2009, US)
Crowe, Russell The Water Diviner (2014, AUS)
Dominik, Andrew Killing Them Softly (2012, US)
Donaldson, Roger The Bank Job (2008, UK)
The Recruit (2003, US)
Thirteen Days (2000, US)
Dante’s Peak (1997, US)
Species (1995, US)
Cocktail (1988, US)
No Way Out (1987, US)
Edgerton, Joel The Gift (2015, US)
Elliott, Stephan The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994, AUS)
Faiman, Peter Crocodile Dundee (1986, AUS)
Gibson, Mel Apocalypto (2006, US),
The Passion of the Christ (2004, US)
Braveheart (1995, US)
Gillespie, Craig Fright Night (2011, US)
Mr Woodcock (2007, US)
Grierson, Alister Sanctum (2011, AUS)
Hicks, Scott The Lucky One (2012, US)
No Reservations (2007, US)
Hearts in Atlantis (2001, US)
Snow Falling on Cedars (1999, US)
Shine (1996, AUS)
Hillcoat, John Lawless (2012, US)
The Road (2009, US)
Hogan, PJ Confessions of a Shopaholic (2009, US)
Peter Pan (2003, US)
My Best Friend’s Wedding (1997, US)
Muriel’s Wedding (1994, AUS)
Hughes, Patrick The Expendables 3 (2014, US)
Hunt, Bruce The Cave (2005, US)
Lawrence, Ray Lantana (2001, AUS)
Luhrmann, Baz The Great Gatsby (2013, AUS)
Australia (2008, AUS)
Moulin Rouge (2001, AUS)
Romeo + Juliet (1996, US)
Strictly Ballroom (1992, AUS)
Luketic, Robert Killers (2010, US)
The Ugly Truth (2009, US) 21 (2008, US)
Monster-in-Law (2005, US)
Win a Date with Tad Hamilton! (2004, US)
Legally Blonde (2001, US)
McLean, Greg Wolf Creek (2005, AUS)
McTeigue, James The Raven (2012, US)
Ninja Assassin (2009, US)
V for Vendetta (2005, US)
Miller, George Happy Feet Two (2011, AUS)
Happy Feet (2006, AUS)
Babe: Pig in the City (1998, AUS)
The Witches of Eastwick (1987, US)
Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome (1985, AUS)
Twilight Zone: The Movie (segment 4) (1983, US)
Miller, George T Andre (1994, US)
The Man from Snowy River (1982, AUS)
Moorhouse, Jocelyn How to Make an American Quilt (1995, US)
Morris, Judy (co-director) Happy Feet (2006, AUS)
Mulcahy, Russell Resident Evil: Extinction (2007, UK)
The Shadow (1994, US)
Ricochet (1991, US)
A Nightmare on Elm Street: The Dream Child (1989, US)
Noonan, Chris Babe (1995, AUS)
Noyce, Phillip The Giver (2014, US)
Salt (2010, US)
The Quiet American (2002, US)
The Bone Collector (1999, US)
The Saint (1997, US)
Clear and Present Danger (1994, US)
Sliver (1993, US
Patriot Games (1992, US)
Polson, John Hide and Seek (2005, US)
Swimfan (2002, US)
Proyas, Alex Knowing (2009, AUS)
I, Robot (2004, US)
Dark City (1998, AUS)
The Crow (1994, US)
Rendall, Kimble Bait 3D (2012, AUS)
Rymer, Michael Queen of the Damned (2002, US)
Schepisi, Fred I.Q. (1994, US)
Mr Baseball (1992, US)
The Russia House (1990, US)
Roxanne (1987, US)
Serious, Yahoo Young Einstein (1988, AUS)
Spierig, Michael Daybreakers (2009, AUS)
Spierig, Peter Daybreakers (2009, AUS)
Stadermann, Alexs Maya the Bee Movie (2014, AUS)
Stainton, John The Crocodile Hunter: Collision Course (2002, AUS)
Stenders, Kriv Red Dog (2011, AUS)
Tass, Nadia Pure Luck (1991, US)
Teplitzky, Jonathan The Railway Man (2013, AUS)
Wan, James Furious 7 (2015)
The Conjuring (2013, US)
Insidious: Chapter 2 (2013, US)
Insidious (2010, US)
Dead Silence (2007, US)
Saw (2004, US)
Weir, Peter The Way Back (2011, US)
Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003, US)
The Truman Show (1998, US)
Green Card (1990, AUS)
Dead Poets Society (1989, US)
Witness (1985, US)
Wincer, Simon Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles (2001, AUS)
Operation Dumbo Drop (1995, US)
Lightning Jack (1994, AUS)
Free Willy (1993, US)
Quigley Down Under (1990, US)

Australian producers with feature film credits earning >US$20 million worldwide

 

Producer Title
Barber, Peter Bait 3D (2012, AUS)
Blight, Rosemary The Sapphires (2012, AUS)
Boughen, Michael Killer Elite (2011, AUS)
Brown, Chris The Railway Man (2013, AUS)
Daybreakers (2009, AUS)
Brown, Martin Moulin Rouge (2001, AUS)
Chapman, Jan Lantana (2001, AUS)
The Piano (1993, AUS)
Clark, Al The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994, AUS)
Collie, Ian Saving Mr Banks (2013, US)
Cornell, John Crocodile Dundee II (1988, AUS)
Crocodile Dundee (1986, AUS)
du Fresne, Kylie The Sapphires (2012, AUS)
Dubiecki, Dan Up in the Air (2009, US)
Jennifer’s Body (2009, US)
Edgerton, Joel The Gift (2015, US)
Fellman, Todd Bait 3D (2012, AUS)
Daybreakers (2009, AUS)
Gibson, Mel Apocalypto (2006, US)
The Passion of the Christ (2004, US)
Braveheart (1995, US)
Grayson Bell, Ross Fight Club (1999, US)
Hamilton, Gary Bait 3D (2012, AUS)
Hill, Grant Cloud Atlas (2012, US)
The Tree of Life (2011, US)
Ninja Assassin (2009, US)
Speed Racer (2008, US)
V for Vendetta (2005, US)
The Thin Red Line (1998, US)
Hogan, Paul Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles (2001, AUS)
Lightning Jack (1994, AUS)
Crocodile Dundee II (1988, AUS)
Crocodile Dundee (1986, AUS)
House, Lynda Muriel’s Wedding (1994, AUS)
Jackman, Hugh X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009, US)
Kidman, Nicole Monte Carlo (2011, US)
In the Cut (2003, US)
Knapman, Catherine The Great Gatsby (2013, AUS)
Australia (2008, AUS)
Lightfoot, David Wolf Creek (2005, AUS)
Luhrmann, Baz The Great Gatsby (2013, AUS)
Australia (2008, AUS)
Moulin Rouge (2001, AUS)
Romeo + Juliet (1996, US)
Lum, Troy The Water Diviner (2014, AUS)
Martin, Catherine The Great Gatsby (2013, AUS)
Mason, Andrew The Water Diviner (2014, AUS)
I, Frankenstein (2014, AUS)
The Cave (2005, US)
Dark City (1998, AUS)
McLean, Greg Wolf Creek (2005, AUS)
Miller, Bill Happy Feet Two (2011, AUS)
Happy Feet (2006, AUS)
Babe: Pig in the City (1998, AUS)
Babe (1995, AUS)
Miller, George Happy Feet Two (2011, AUS)
Happy Feet (2006, AUS)
Babe: Pig in the City (1998, AUS)
Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome (1985, AUS)
Twilight Zone: The Movie (segment 4) (1983, US)
Mitchell, Doug Happy Feet Two (2011, AUS)
Happy Feet (2006, AUS)
Babe: Pig in the City (1998, AUS)
Babe (1995, AUS)
Moorhouse, Jocelyn Muriel’s Wedding (1994, AUS)
Papandrea, Bruna Wild (2014, US)
Warm Bodies (2013, US)
Swimfan (2002, US)
Proyas, Alex Knowing (2009, AUS)
Sherman, Emile The King’s Speech (2010, UK)
Ross, Warwick Young Einstein (1988, AUS)
Ryan, Julie Red Dog (2011, AUS)
Scott, Jane Mao’s Last Dancer (2009, AUS)
Shine (1996, AUS)
Crocodile Dundee II (1988, AUS)
Serious, Yahoo Young Einstein (1988, AUS)
Stephen, Barbara Maya the Bee Movie (2014, AUS)
Stigwood, Robert Evita (1996, US)
Staying Alive (1983, US)
The Fan (1981, US)
Grease (1978, US)
Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1978, US)
Saturday Night Fever (1977, US)
Weir, Peter The Way Back (2011, US)
Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003, US)
Green Card (1991, AUS)
Woss, Nelson J Red Dog (2011, AUS)
Yeldham, Rebecca The Gift (2015, US)
The Kite Runner (2007, US)
The Motorcycle Diaries (2004, US)

Australian writers with feature film credits earning >US$20 million worldwide

 

Writer Title
Anastasios, Andrew The Water Diviner (2014, AUS)
Beattie, Stuart I, Frankenstein (2014, AUS)
Pirates of the Caribbean (2003–2011, US)
G.I. Joe: Rise of the Cobra (2009, US)
Australia (2008, AUS)
30 Days of Night (2007, US)
Derailed (2005, US)
Collateral (2004, US)
Bovell, Andrew A Most Wanted Man (2014, US)
Edge of Darkness (2010, UK)
Lantana (2001, AUS)
Briggs, Tony The Sapphires (2012, AUS)
Campion, Jane In the Cut (2003, US)
The Piano (1993, AUS)
Cave, Nick Lawless (2012, US)
Coleman, Warren Happy Feet Two (2011, AUS)
Happy Feet (2006, AUS)
Collee, John Walking with Dinosaurs (2013, US)
Happy Feet (2006, AUS)
Master and Commander (2003, US)
Cornell, John Crocodile Dundee (1986, AUS)
Eck, Gary Happy Feet Two (2011, AUS)
Edgerton, Joel The Gift (2015, US)
Edquist, Fin Maya the Bee Movie (2014, AUS)
Elliott, Stephan The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994, AUS)
Flanagan, Richard Australia (2008, AUS)
Garvin, John Sanctum (2011, AUS)
Gibson, Mel Apocalypto (2006, US)
The Passion of the Christ (2004, US)
Hayes, Terry From Hell (2001, US)
Vertical Limit (2000, US)
Payback (1999, US)
Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome (1985, AUS)
Hicks, Scott Snow Falling on Cedars (1999, US)
Shine (1996, AUS)
Hogan, PJ Peter Pan (2003, US)
Muriel’s Wedding (1994, AUS)
Hogan, Paul Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles (2001, AUS)
Lightning Jack (1994, AUS)
Crocodile Dundee II (1988, AUS)
Crocodile Dundee (1986, AUS)
Jones, Laura Angela’s Ashes (1999, US)
Kennedy, Duncan Deep Blue Sea (1999, US)
Kim, John Bait 3D (2012, AUS)
Knight, Andrew The Water Diviner (2014, AUS)
Lamprell, Mark Babe: Pig in the City (1998, AUS)
Luhrmann, Baz The Great Gatsby (2013, AUS)
Australia (2008, AUS)
Moulin Rouge (2001, AUS)
Romeo + Juliet (1996, US)
Strictly Ballroom (1992, AUS)
McLean, Greg Wolf Creek (2005, AUS)
Miller, George Happy Feet Two (2011, AUS)
Happy Feet (2006, AUS)
Babe: Pig in the City (1998, AUS)
Babe (1995, AUS)
Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome (1985, AUS)
Morris, Judy Happy Feet (2006, AUS)
Babe: Pig in the City (1998, AUS)
Mulcahy, Russell Bait 3D (2012, AUS)
Noonan, Chris Babe (1995, AUS)
Nowra, Louis K-19: The Widowmaker (2002, UK)
Pearce, Craig The Great Gatsby (2013, AUS)
Charlie St Cloud (2010, US)
Moulin Rouge (2001, AUS)
Romeo + Juliet (1996, US)
Strictly Ballroom (1992, AUS)
Petroni, Michael The Book Thief (2013, US)
The Rite (2011, US)
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (2010, US)
Queen of the Damned (2002, US)
Proyas, Alex Dark City (1998, AUS)
Roach, David Young Einstein (1988, AUS)
Rosenberg, Craig The Uninvited (2009, US)
After the Sunset (2004, US)
Sardi, Jan Mao’s Last Dancer (2009, AUS)
The Notebook (2004, US)
Shine (1996, AUS)
Serious, Yahoo Young Einstein (1988, AUS)
Shadie, Ken Crocodile Dundee (1986, AUS)
Sherring, Matt Killer Elite (2011, AUS)
Smith, Sue Saving Mr Banks (2013, US)
Spierig, Michael Daybreakers (2009, AUS)
Spierig, Peter Daybreakers (2009, AUS)
Stainton, John The Crocodile Hunter: Collision Course (2002, AUS)
Stern, Emil Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’hoole (2010, AUS)
Thompson, Keith The Sapphires (2012, AUS)
Wan, James Insidious: Chapter 2 (2013, US)
Dead Silence (2007, US)
Saw III (2006, US)
Saw (2004, US)
Weir, Peter The Way Back (2011, US)
Master and Commander (2003, US)
Green Card (1990, AUS)
Whannell, Leigh Insidious: Chapter 2 (2013, US)
Insidious (2010, US)
Dead Silence (2007, US)
Saw III (2006, US)
Saw II (2005, US)
Saw (2004, US)
For more information, go to the Producer Offset section of the Screen Australia website.

 

Screen Australia has made all reasonable efforts to ensure the accuracy of data. To report any inaccuracies or omissions, please email Research at Screen Australia.

 

For general funding and contracting information, see Doing Business with Us on the Screen Australia website.